Latest press release

Greater focus to be given to pharmacy practice research through a new FIP group 

The Hague, 4 July 2016 — Development of strategies for pharmacy practice research is to be facilitated by a newly established special interest group within the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP).

One of the objectives of the Special Interest Group on Pharmacy Practice Research, set out today, is to increase pharmacy contributions to global health through widening access to the latest high quality international pharmacy practice research.

“It is thanks to pharmacy practice research that many pharmacy services are being offered and paid for. The development of new services is also, more and more, being influenced by practice research,” said Professor Charlie Benrimoj, the group’s first chair and Head of the Graduate School of Health at University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.

He added: “The scope of pharmacy practice research has expanded over the past 50 years to encompass the clinical, behavioural, economic and humanistic implications of the practice of pharmacy, heath care systems, medicines use and patient care. The Special Interest Group on Pharmacy Practice Research will allow exchange of pharmacy practice research between senior researchers, early career researchers, postdoctoral fellows, pharmacist practitioners and PhD or MSc students in order to produce high quality evidence at an international level.”

 

Notes for editors

About FIP
The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is in official relations with the World Health Organization. Through its 137 member organisations, it represents over three million practitioners and scientists around the world. www.fip.org

FIP’s Board of Pharmaceutical Sciences now has nine special interest groups. Further information about the Special Interest Group for Pharmacy Practice Research is available at http://fip.org/Pharmacy_Practice_Research.

PRESS CONTACT
Adlan Magomedov, communications assistant
Email adlan@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1979


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Launch of new guidance to make children’s medicines safer and more effective

The Hague, 13 June 2016 — To address the gap in children’s medicines, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) today release new guidelines for health care professionals prescribing or supplying medicines for children when no authorised product exists. The guidelines are available to all countries and professionals on the two organisations’ web sites.

Paediatricians and health professionals all over the world have long struggled with the lack of authorised and commercially available child-specific medicines. They are often forced to use adult medicines when treating children, for example by crushing tablets or making products from scratch. This approach poses significant risks, increasing the potential for inaccurate dosing and impacting on the quality, safety and efficacy of the medicine.

The new guidance provides advice based on the available evidence, best practices and sound scientific and therapeutic principles. For instance, if a prescribed medicine is not available in an age-appropriate formulation, using a commercially available medicine with a similar therapeutic action, which is available in a more suitable form, may be considered. Examples are provided.

“Children are more susceptible to medication errors and at greater risk of negative consequences from them. Right now in hospitals we still have to compound products for children every day, many times a day, and this guidance — the first international consensus-based approach dealing with this subject — is much needed,” said Dr Régis Vaillancourt, Director of Pharmacy at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Canada, and a contributor to the guidance document.

“We need to ensure these guidelines are made available to all countries, particularly in poorly-resourced ones, where the burden of disease and children’s need for treatments are more acute,” said Dr Sabine Kopp, Group Lead, Medicines Quality Assurance, WHO. “While we wait for the research industry to catch up on children’s medicines, this is the best alternative we have at present.”

“Better access to safe and effective medicines for children is an important part of reducing child mortality; a United Nations Sustainable Development Goal target. This guidance, the result of more than 5 years of work, will improve children’s access to treatment,” said Ms Gugu Mahlangu, chairperson of the expert committee to the guidance and Director General of the Medicines Control Authority of Zimbabwe.

 

Notes for editors

The document “FIP-WHO technical guidelines: Points to consider in the provision by health care professionals of children-specific preparations that are not available as authorized products” is available at http://fip.org/statements.

About the World Health Organization

The World Health Organization is the directing and coordinating authority on international health within the United Nations’ system. It provides leadership on matters critical to health and engages in partnerships where joint action is needed; sets, promotes and monitors norms and standards; and shapes the health research agenda. www.who.int/en/

About FIP

The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is in official relations with the World Health Organization. Through its 137 member organisations, it represents over three million practitioners and scientists around the world. www.fip.org

PRESS CONTACT

Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager

Email linnam@fip.org

Tel +31 70 302 1987

 

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World Pharmacists Day 2016 focuses on care

The Hague, 8 March 2016 — “Pharmacists: Caring for you” is the theme of this year’s World Pharmacists Day (25 September), the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) announced today.

“This year’s theme was chosen to reflect the important role of pharmacists in providing care to the public, and also to highlight the emotional connection they have with their patients. The role of pharmacists has evolved from that of a provider of medicines to that of a provider of care. Pharmacists have a vital role in the outcome of pharmacological therapies and ultimately strive to improve patients’ quality of life,” said FIP President Dr Carmen Peña.
 
World Pharmacists Day, now in its sixth year, is used by FIP’s members around the globe to highlight the impact and added value of the pharmacy profession and its role in improving health to authorities, other professions and the media, as well as to the general public.
 
FIP has produced a number of resources in the six official United Nations languages which pharmacists and professional associations can use in support of World Pharmacists Day. These include a new look logo, official campaign images that feature real pharmacists, and materials for social media.
 
FIP is inviting individual pharmacists to support World Pharmacists Day by creating profile pictures for social media using an official FIP Twibbon or a specially designed “I care for you” placard, which can be printed and held in photographs. The resources are available now at www.fip.org/worldpharmacistsday.
 
“Pharmacists have the expertise to provide patient care services that are cost-effective and of high quality. They are the most accessible health professionals, and the public places great trust in them, as shown by many surveys ranking pharmacists among the most trusted professions. We encourage all pharmacists to make use of World Pharmacists Day; a wonderful opportunity to promote our profession,” said Mr Luc Besançon, FIP CEO and general secretary.


Notes for editors

Images

     
eg, campaign image   eg, Twibbon   eg, placard


About World Pharmacists Day

World Pharmacists Day was adopted by the FIP Council at the 2009 World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in Istanbul, Turkey. September 25 was chosen because it is the date that the FIP came into existence in 1912. The purpose of World Pharmacists Day is to encourage activities that promote and advocate for the role of the pharmacist in improving health in every corner of the world. Examples and images of World Pharmacists Day activities and celebrations from 2015 are available at http://on.fb.me/1TRb2Ut.

ABOUT FIP

The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 137 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

PRESS CONTACT

Adian Magomedov, communications assistant
Email adian@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1979

 

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FIP publishes guide to help pharmacists establish tobacco-free communities

The Hague, 16 December, 2015 — In time for the quit smoking New Year resolutions that are anticipated at the end of this month, the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) has outlined the wide variety of different ways in which pharmacists can reduce the use of tobacco through a new publication. The briefing document, “Establishing tobacco-free communities: A practical guide for pharmacists”, gives a number of examples from around the world, showcasing pharmacists’ value in performing health promotion, triage and referral as well as other interventions.

Moreover, the document contains tools that pharmacists can use to assess a person’s nicotine dependence and readiness to stop smoking, motivational interviewing models, quit plans and follow-up activities to avoid relapse.

“It is clear that pharmacist-led interventions can be pharmacological, including optimising treatment outcomes, or non-pharmacological. Importantly, pharmacists are supporters and facilitators of the entire smoking cessation process; this is of huge value in providing much needed continuous support to people who have decided to be healthier,” said Mrudula Naidu, immediate past chair of the Young Pharmacists Group, a network within FIP that was a key contributor to the document.

This briefing document, released today, aims to make visible the contributions of pharmacists and provide a platform for future initiatives that national pharmacy associations may run to support pharmacists and the creation of well-designed interventions in pharmacies. It can also serve as inspiration for individuals, the authors say.

“With this document, we aim to further encourage pharmacists and their professional associations to invigorate open discussions on the value of tobacco cessation with their patients, communities, teams and collaborators. New Year is a particularly opportune time,” Ms Naidu said.

 

Notes for editors

Document available at http://fip.org/publications

ABOUT FIP

The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 137 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

PRESS CONTACT

Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager, International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987

 

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Pharmacists and scientists can take the lead in reducing the environmental impact of medicines, FIP says

The Hague, 1 December, 2015 — The entire medicines use process must be changed so as to minimise the environmental effects of pharmaceuticals, the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) says. The statement is made in a reference document published today by FIP as United Nations leaders meet to talk about climate change.

“Green pharmacy practice: Taking responsibility for the environmental impact of medicines” describes the different ways in which pharmaceuticals find their way into our water supplies, soil and atmosphere, and presents current findings on their levels in the environment. It also describes some of the negative effects that pharmaceuticals in the environment can have on living organisms and the actions that pharmacists have been taking to reduce their impact. “Through this reference document FIP is supporting full engagement of the pharmacy profession in reducing the environmental impact of medicines. Pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists can provide meaningful leadership in this area where leadership is desperately needed. This is a great opportunity for the profession,” the authors say.

Responsibility for the management of medicines includes minimising the environmental impact that they can have during research and development through to disposal. For example, there are ways of designing environmentally benign products and processes. Furthermore, ensuring rational use is an important way of minimising waste, the authors explain.

“This document is intended to increase awareness in our profession of what can be done at ground level and higher to protect our environment, and through that, the health of our communities. It could also be used to remind policymakers to consider the valuable role pharmacists can play in this issue,” said Eeva Teräsalmi, co-chair of the FIP Working Group on Pharmaceuticals and the Environment.

“Green pharmacy practice is better pharmacy practice,” Ms Teräsalmi added. The reference document provides a foundation for further work by FIP to produce a set of recommendations on green pharmacy.

 

Notes for editors

Reference document available at http://fip.org/publications

ABOUT FIP

The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 137 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

PRESS CONTACT

Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager, International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987

 

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New global report details trend in advanced roles for pharmacists

Düsseldorf, 2 October 2015 The first ever international overview of the extent of the advanced and specialised roles that pharmacists are undertaking, and the mechanisms supporting these developments, was presented at the World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences today. The information is contained in a new report, “Advanced practice and specialisation in pharmacy: Global report”, produced by the International Pharmaceutical Federation Education Initiative (FIPEd).

“Around the world, pharmacists’ roles are becoming more diversified. Some countries are recognising this by area of specialty practice in a sector or clinical area, others are identifying advanced performance using evidence-driven, developmental frameworks; so there are a variety of means to recognise practice beyond that seen at initial registration,” said co-author Kirstie Galbraith.

The report gives access to information from 48 countries and territories, including case studies that outline trends in policy development related to advanced and specialised roles, such as the development of national definitions, criteria and professional recognition systems. For example, in over 40% of the countries, formal post-nominal credentials are available to recognise an advanced or specialist pharmacy practitioner. Mandated requirements for pharmacists to have achieved a formal level of advancement or specialism in order to provide some services are also emerging. In Switzerland, for instance, it will soon be mandatory for pharmacists in charge of a community or hospital pharmacy to hold a recognised post-registration title.

Almost 60% of countries have frameworks for advanced and specialised practice either available or in development, the report reveals. “Assurance of competency that is commensurate with advanced practice is a clear message to civil society that pharmacists possess this expertise. This report contains the most comprehensive collection of data relating to advanced and specialised roles, and countries can use it in their professional workforce development,” Ms Galbraith said.

The report serves as important information for the World Health Organization and its work on transformative education for health professionals. “The information contained in this report is vital to help identify workforce needs that directly impact on universal health coverage and the achievement of targets such as the millennium and sustainable development goals. This is all in the interest of patients, health systems and the profession,” added Professor Ian Bates, co-author of the report.


Notes for editors

FULL REPORT: “Advanced practice and specialisation in pharmacy: Global report” is available at www.fip.org/educationreports.

ABOUT FIP: The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 132 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

ABOUT FIPEd: FIPEd brings together all of FIP’s education actions. Its purpose is to ensure that education and training provides the foundation for developing pharmaceuticals, pharmaceutical services and the profession in order to meet societal needs for medicines expertise.

ABOUT the World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences: The 75th annual World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences is being held in Düsseldorf, Germany, from 29 September to 3 October.

PRESS CONTACT

Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager,
International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987

 

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FIP invests in a blueprint for the pharmacy workforce

Düsseldorf, 1 October 2015 — Education leaders from around the globe will journey to Nanjing, China, next year to create a blueprint for the pharmacy workforce of the future, the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) announced today.

They will meet at the Global Conference on Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Education, to be held on 7 and 8 November 2016. “We want to identify and address key issues related to education and the pharmacy workforce, in collaboration with our stakeholders. Significant resources will go into this,” said Philip Schneider, Chair of the Conference Planning Committee.

The conference will welcome education and practice leaders, delegates from FIP member organisations and other key stakeholders from the global pharmaceutical community to construct a shared global vision for pharmaceutical education and the pharmacy workforce. It will lead to the release of the first ever set of global workforce development goals in the context of health care needs and medicines innovation.

FIP is co-hosting this landmark conference with the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

“This conference is a critical element of our strategy at FIP, which follows our Centennial Declaration in 2012 that was signed by 127 member associations of FIP to accept responsibility and accountability for improving global health. Having a workforce in sufficient quantity and competence is critical to meeting this goal. The time is now to make the opportunity, jointly, for creating a vision and ambitious goals for the education and training of that workforce,” Professor Schneider said.

 

Notes for editors

LOGO available here 

ABOUT FIP: The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is in official relations with the World Health Organization. Through its 126 member organisations, it represents over three million practitioners and scientists around the world. www.fip.org

PRESS CONTACT

Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager,
International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987

 

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Seminal report reveals state of pharmacy remuneration around the world

Düsseldorf, 29 September 2015 Too many community pharmacies are subsidising professional services from their own pockets, according to the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP). This statement follows its publication today of a new report, “Sustainability of pharmacy services: Advancing global health”, which gives an international overview of remuneration models for community and hospital pharmacy.

The report is the first of its kind — produced primarily by pharmacists and health economists — and based on data from 49 countries. It reveals a common concern among pharmacy associations worldwide over the long-term financial viability of community pharmacies, independent pharmacies in particular, owing to successive price and margin cuts.

There is general interest from government and other stakeholders in increasing the services offered by pharmacists, the survey found, with evidence of more service-oriented roles with greater public health responsibilities. However, the report’s authors say that despite a “philosophical shift” towards a more service-focused model of care, community and hospital pharmacy remuneration models remain largely product-focused. They say that this in itself constitutes a barrier towards new services. For example, only two responding countries confirmed systems of remuneration that provided incentive for expanded services from hospital pharmacies. Moreover, as payments based on the volume of medicines dispensed decrease, there will be “an urgent need to find other sources of revenue to support quality, comprehensive pharmacy services”.

Another finding is that, in most countries, dispensing fees relate to the product and include the provision of advice but do not always value this advice giving appropriately. Re-evaluation is needed, the authors say. For example, if the provision of advice were to be remunerated as a service in its own right, this would also give further incentive to pharmacists always to give appropriate and comprehensive advice. 

The full report, the result of two years’ work, has been produced for the exclusive use of FIP’s member organisations. “We present this report so that our members have a fresh, global view of the state of remuneration. From this they can reflect on their own systems, the direction of pharmacy and what they want to achieve for the profession. This report is intended to support them with ideas, options and comparisons to build more sustainable remuneration models, which, ultimately, will allow pharmacies to continue to care for patients,” said Luc Besançon, FIP CEO and General Secretary.

Notes for editors

Pdf of the report’s Executive Summary and Key Points: here

Interviews available with: Mr Luc Besançon, FIP CEO and General Secretary.

ABOUT FIP:  The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. Through its 132 member organisations, it represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

OUT the World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences: The 75th annual World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences is being held in Düsseldorf, Germany, from 29 September to 3 October. The congress is being hosted by FIP in collaboration with the Federal Union of German Associations of Pharmacists (ABDA).

PRESS CONTACT

Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager,
International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987

 

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FIP produces Arabic pictograms to help refugees with their medicines

The Hague, 23 September 2015 The global refugee crisis, particularly the nine million Syrians estimated to have fled their homes since 2011, has prompted the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) to undertake urgent work to help pharmacists ensure that refugees who need medicines understand how to take them. An Arabic version of the FIP pictogram software is released today. FIP’s pictograms provide a means of communicating medication instructions when there is no common language or when patients have low literacy levels.

“Pictograms are instructions, such as “take in the morning” or “do not take with food”, in the form of a picture. Most FIP pictograms have had their meaning validated and many have been culturally adapted to ensure effective comprehension. The pictograms are housed in software called PictoRx,” said Régis Vaillancourt, Director of Pharmacy at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Canada, whose team has been working on the project.

The FIP pictogram project has been in development for eight years. The release of the resource in Arabic coincides with the launch of an improved version of the software, which allows pharmacists to build, quickly and easily, storyboards (of instructions), information sheets and medication calendars for their patients.

“Pharmacists have a duty to ensure the proper use of medicines. In view of the language barriers faced by migrants, these pictograms have the potential to play an important role in optimising treatment compliance and improving medication safety in this group,” Dr Vaillancourt said.

PictoRx may also be used for patients who have slight cognitive impairment or impaired vision. It is available to download free from the FIP website.

Arabic is the latest language to be added to the software, joining English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Maori, German, Chinese and Polish.

Notes for editors

PictoRx can be downloaded at www.fip.org/pictograms. The updated software will be demonstrated at the 75th World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in Düsseldorf, Germany, next week.

IMAGES available: 


INTERVIEWS available with: Dr Régis Vaillancourt

ABOUT FIP: The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 132 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

PRESS CONTACT
Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager,
International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987


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International standards for hospital pharmacy revised 

The Hague, 10 September 2015 — Global standards of practice used by hospital pharmacists around the world have been revised and are released today by the Hospital Pharmacy Section (HPS) of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP).

The standards, known as the "Basel Statements” and first published by the HPS in 2009, cover six main areas of hospital pharmacy:

• Procurement
• Influences on prescribing
• Preparation and delivery of medicines
• Medicines administration
• Monitoring medication
• Human resources and training.

The revision reflects the rapid development of hospital pharmacy practice and the most current evidence, in order to continue to encourage practice development around the globe.

“There are several totally new statements, many of them dealing with advances in information technology and the importance of pharmacists using electronic health records to improve the quality of medicines use by our patients. And significant changes have been made to reflect FIP’s definition of 'responsible use of medicines' adopted in 2012, and the joint FIP-World Health Organization Guidelines on Good Pharmacy Practice adopted since the initial Basel Statements were published,” said HPS secretary Lee Vermeulen.

The wording of the Basel Statements has also been simplified to make them clearer and more easily applicable from country to country.

The revision process involved a consensus exercise that collated the opinions and experience of hundreds of hospital pharmacists from dozens of countries. The result is an authoritative resource that reflects ideal practices for hospital pharmacy worldwide.

“We believe that the statements provide a key roadmap for hospital pharmacy practice. One of the key strengths of the Basel Statements is the breadth of input that has been obtained, making the statements truly global and truly reflective of the ideal standards,” Mr Vermeulen said.

Since the Basel Statements were first introduced, a number of countries and regions have used them — both individual statements and entire areas within the full set — to enhance hospital pharmacy. Many countries have used the statements as an evaluative benchmark to identify areas for practice improvement, and as a measure of successful practice development.

“As with the original statements, the overarching goal is to maximise the value that hospital pharmacists bring to the well-being of patients,” Mr Vermeulen said.

There are now 65 Basel Statements.

 

Notes for editors

BASEL STATEMENTS: Full document, videos and further information available at www.fip.org/basel-statements

IMAGES available: 

Basel statements infographic
Infographic of the Basel Statements themes

 

INTERVIEWS available with: Mr Lee Vermeulen, Secretary, FIP Hospital Pharmacy Section, or a hospital pharmacist from your region.

ABOUT FIP: The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 132 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

About the FIP Hospital Pharmacy Section: Established in 1957, the Hospital Pharmacy Section focuses on education, communication and improving the practice of pharmacy in hospitals around the world.

PRESS CONTACT
Lin-Nam Wang, Communications manager,
International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987


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Lab Boxes: a new project building the pharmacy workforce

The Hague, 29 July 2015 — A new project in Malawi shows how a carefully selected assortment of basic laboratory equipment can bring teaching to life and widen career options for pharmacy students.
 

Its impacts are reported in a video released today by the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP): https://youtu.be/nuH9HdCAbjM

A lack of laboratory equipment in a number of pharmacy schools, particularly in developing countries, means that students are not able to gain much needed hands-on laboratory experience and this can limit their understanding of pharmacy practice and career choices. 

Known as the “Lab Box Project”, a pilot set up under the FIP UNESCO-UNITWIN programme offers a solution. Lab Boxes consist of just 24 types of item and are proving sufficient to allow students to conduct key experiments throughout the pharmacy curriculum, according to early reports. They make a cost-effective contribution to wider efforts to build a skilled pharmacy workforce. 

“Malawi needs pharmacists. In 2012 it had just 73 pharmacists and 174 pharmacy technicians for a population of around 16 million. There has been progress in that the first school of pharmacy opened in 2006 but a lack of resources has hampered learning and the acquisition of skills,” explains Jennifer Marriott, director of the FIP UNESCO-UNITWIN programme.

Each Lab Box costs US$99, and 50 were dispatched to the Department of Pharmacy, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, in September 2014. Reports from students and staff reveal how effective the Lab Boxes have been, allowing students to graduate with laboratory skills that could be used to deal with priorities such as detecting counterfeit medicines, assessing the quality of medicines, discovering and developing new medicines, and advocating for the development of national protocols and policies promoting good manufacturing practice.

Owing to the pilot’s reported success, pharmacy schools in Liberia and Sierra Leone have contacted FIP with requests for Lab Boxes. “Ultimately this work is all about helping to ensure sufficient coverage and skills of pharmacists around the world and there was no better place to start than in Africa, where healthcare systems can be fragile and pharmacists are so desperately needed,” Professor Marriott said.

 

Notes for editors

IMAGES DOWLOAD HERE

FIP Lab Box video Lab box demo Lab boxes in class


VIDEO
Watch FIP’s Lab Box video at https://youtu.be/nuH9HdCAbjM


INTERVIEWS available with Professor Jennifer Marriott
 

ABOUT FIP The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 132 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, and works towards the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

MORE ABOUT UNITWIN The UNITWIN programme was conceived as a way to advance research, training and programme development in all of UNESCO’s fields of competence by building university networks and encouraging inter-university cooperation through the transfer of knowledge across borders. There are currently 69 UNITWIN networks. The FIP UNESCO-UNITWIN programme is the only UNESCO-accredited healthcare professional network. 

PRESS CONTACT
Mike Spijker, Marketing and Communications Coordinator, FIP
Email mike@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1977

 

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UNESCO renews unique agreement to develop pharmacy education with FIP

The Hague, The Netherlands, 12 June 2015 Development of pharmacy education around the world through a unique collaboration between the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP), University College London School of Pharmacy and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is to continue for a further four years.


The collaboration is a UNESCO-sponsored programme known as the Global Pharmacy Education Development Network (GPhEd). Launched in 2010, this was the first programme for health professionals under UNESCO’s University Twinning and Networking Programme (UNITWIN). This global network has brought together pharmacy schools and stakeholders from across the globe with aims of synchronising powerful development in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences education, improving communication for scientific innovation and healthcare outcomes and, ultimately, enabling attainment of Millienium Development Goals.

UNESCO has renewed the agreement with FIP “in light of the very good results achieved”. Major achievements of the network so far have included the development a Global Pharmacy Workforce Observatory (which collates pharmacy workforce data with the long-term aim of improving access to medicines and care) and the creation of a Centre of Excellence across Africa (which currently works to enhance professional education in pharmacy schools in Uganda, Ghana, Nigeria, Zambia, Namibia and Malawi).

“Being reaccredited for a further four years shows that the network has credibility and value for UNESCO and the wider development community, and that our project goals continue to be relevant and successful,” said Professor Jennifer Marriot, director of the FIP UNESCO-UNITWIN collaboration.
“The renewal will support further work to enhance education, development and workforce planning at global level, including a new venture with Monash University, Australia, to develop a ‘global community of practice for pharmacy educators’,” said GPhEd coordinator Professor Ian Bates.

“Such projects make the future very exciting for our global network. Using the UNITWIN banner we are able to provide better linkages with countries and promote the whole initiative better at global level,” Professor Bates added.

Notes for editors


ABOUT FIP The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 132 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world. www.fip.org

MORE ABOUT UNITWIN Established in 1992, the UNITWIN programme was conceived as a way to advance research, training and programme development in all of UNESCO’s fields of competence by building university networks and encouraging inter-university cooperation through the transfer of knowledge across borders. There are currently 69 UNITWIN networks. The Global Pharmacy Education Development Network continues to be the only healthcare professional network accredited by UNESCO.

PRESS CONTACT
Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager, International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987


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New leader for global work on pharmacy workforce and education

Santpoort, The Netherlands, 19 March, 2015 William Charman, dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at Monash University, Australia, has been chosen to lead the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) Education Initiative Steering Committee. Professor Charman was selected by the FIP Bureau at its meeting in the Netherlands yesterday, and will take office as the Steering Committee chairman on 1 August. 


Professor Charman, who is also director of the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, believes that although the FIP Education Initiative (FIPEd) has achieved much since its inception, the next five years will be critical to building on its many successes and to demonstrating the tangible benefits of its programmes to stakeholders around the world.

He said he was thrilled and humbled to be selected to work with the team of talented individuals that comprise FIPEd: “Education is an essential agent of global practice change — and FIPEd has positioned itself to accelerate this journey by identifying and implementing a structure to support its global vision. I look forward to helping the FIPEd team rapidly execute their respective plans; to broadening the depth of engagement with educators around the world; and for the impact of FIPEd-related activities to be tangible, relevant and welcomed.”

“Integrity, transparency, broad and energetic stakeholder engagement, accountability and inclusiveness will be hallmarks of my chairmanship,” Professor Charman added.

The FIPEd chair mandate is two years, renewable once. This year, FIPEd’s work includes an update on the global pharmacy workforce and research into pharmacy advanced practice/specialisation and on interprofessional education.


Notes for editors


IMAGE of Professor Charman available at

Professor William Charman

 

 

 

 Professor Charman’s biography  

 

ABOUT FIP
The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. With 132 member organisations FIP represents more than three million experts in medicines, supporting the responsible use of medicines around the world.

ABOUT the FIP Education Initiative (FIPEd)
FIPEd brings together all of FIP’s education actions. Its purpose is to support the reform of pharmacy education so that there will be sufficient and competent pharmacists everywhere in the world. It believes that education and training provides the foundation for developing pharmaceuticals, pharmaceutical services and the profession in order to meet societal needs for medicines expertise. FIPEd’s partners include UNESCO and the WHO.
 
PRESS CONTACT
Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager, International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987

 

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International oath for pharmacists now available


The Hague, the Netherlands, 7 November 2014 — An oath for pharmacists has today been officially released by the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP). It is intended for use at events in schools of pharmacy to launch students towards their studies or at public events such as graduation ceremonies and professional conferences. Pharmacy associations and institutions around the world may also choose to use the FIP oath as a model to be adapted according to their countries’ needs.

Developed by FIP’s Working Group on Pharmacist Ethics and Professional Autonomy, the wording of the oath was adopted by the Council of FIP in Bangkok, Thailand, on 31 August. “Although some pharmacy oaths already exist, an advantage of the FIP model is that pharmacists can be confident it was prepared with an international perspective, taking into account the most fundamental principles that guide the ethical behaviour of members of our profession,” said William Zellmer, co-chairman of the working group.

In an article published in the International Pharmacy Journal explaining the background to the oath and emphasising its value, he and working group co-chair Betty Chaar write: “An oath of a pharmacist, if used properly, can be an important instrument in deepening pharmacists’ sense of professional obligation.” Contained in the oath are vows to protect confidentiality and to nurture the preparation of future members of the profession.

“All health professionals regularly face ethical and moral challenges and can benefit from a reminder, from time to time, of the commitment they made to support, above all, the health and well-being of those they serve. Pharmacists might even consider posting a copy of the oath in their practice setting,” they add.

An A4-sized, printable version of the oath is currently available in four languages, English, German, Spanish and Mongolian, with more translations to come.


Notes for editors

Printable A4 version (English) www.fip.org/files/fip/FIP_Pharmacist_oath_A4_with_signature.pdf

Other versions at http://www.fip.org/statements

FULL IPJ ARTICLE here.

ABOUT FIP and the International Pharmacy Journal (IPJ)
The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is a non-governmental organisation in official relations with the World Health Organization. Through its 132 member organisations, it represents over three million practitioners and scientists around the world. www.fip.org
The IPJ is the official journal of FIP.
 
PRESS CONTACT
Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager, International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email linnam@fip.org
Tel +31 70 302 1987

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Boost for pharmacy workforce in Africa, with other areas of the world to follow

Bangkok, Thailand, 4 September — A “centre of excellence” that aims to increase capacity for pharmacy education in the African region was officially launched today at the International Pharmaceutical Federation’s World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Its main purpose is to help pharmacy schools in Africa produce desperately needed pharmacists through the sharing of teaching resources, staff exchange to increase academic capacity and joint problem-solving.

The Centre of Excellence for Africa, formed as part of a FIP UNESCO-UNITWIN programme, has five major areas of activity — capability, innovation, clinical training, communication and quality. “The centre is virtual in that it has no physical location. Rather, it is an organised network that encourages input from a large number of pharmacy schools, enabling far greater involvement than a physical centre,” explained Jennifer Marriott, director of the FIP UNESCO-UNITWIN collaboration.

As part of the FIP UNESCO-UNITWIN programme pharmacy schools around the world can access free resources contributed by universities around the world to support educational activities and this is particularly useful for resource poor schools such as those in many parts of Africa. These resources are available at saber.monash.edu and include programs such as MyDispense (a pharmacy simulator that allows students to practise dispensing) and an online tableting plant.

“Centre of excellence tools, especially for practical demonstrations in situations lacking such facilities would be of benefit. For example, at our school, an online tableting plant would be of great learning value for the trainee pharmacy students,” said Lungwani Muungo, founding head of the pharmacy department at the University of Zambia and current dean of the School of Pharmacy, Nutrition & Dietetics at Lusaka Apex Medical University.

Africa was chosen as the first region to benefit from a centre of excellence because its needs are greatest with the lowest density of pharmacists in the world. The FIP Education Initiative’s 2013 global education report indicated that African countries tend to have lower educational capacity and supply pipelines for pharmacists. Of the 20 countries found to have the lowest number of pharmacy graduates per capita in a survey of 95, 16 were African.

Today, the Centre of Excellence for Africa’s founding partners — representatives of pharmacy schools in Ghana, Namibia, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia — gathered in Bangkok, Thailand, to sign the ratification documents.
“The formation of the African centre of excellence has great potential to advance pharmacy education in the region by increasing inter-nation cooperation and targeting local priorities for action. One of the activities of the centre is to develop an expertise map to facilitate staff exchange between schools in the region,” Professor Marriott said.

The centre of excellence is part of a larger body of work that includes the continued development of sustainable and significant working partnerships between African leaders in education and development and the FIP Education Initiative, and the development of advanced pharmacy practice or specialisations in an African context.

Further centres are planned for other regions of need. “The centre of excellence is developing an environment to share ideas, expertise and to find solutions to common problems. What we learn during the formation of the Centre of Excellence for Africa can be used to develop other centres to provide assistance to pharmacy education in countries through a shared practice model,” Professor Marriott added.

Notes for editors

IMAGES available at www.flickr.com/photos/FIPcongress
1. Centre of Excellence for Africa signing

ABOUT FIP
The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is in official relations with the World Health Organization. Through its 126 member organisations, it represents over three million practitioners and scientists around the world. The FIP Education Initiative is an FIP directorate.
www.fip.org

ABOUT the FIP UNESCO-UNITWIN network (Global Pharmacy Education Development; GPhEd)
The Global Pharmacy Education Development network is a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) sponsored initiative run under its University Twinning and Networking Programme (UNITWIN). This network brings together pharmacy schools from all over the world in order to develop education in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences and, ultimately, to attain United Nations health-related Millennium Development Goals, which include reducing disease, decreasing child mortality and improving maternal health. Aims of GPhEd include tackling challenges of academic capacity, quality assurance of educational systems and workforce competency in pharmacy education institutions. GPhEd is unique in that it is the only UNITWIN network among the health care professions.

ABOUT the World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
The 74th annual World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences is taking place in Bangkok, Thailand, from 31 August to 4 September. Pharmacists and pharmaceutical sciences from across the globe have gathered under the theme “Access to medicines and pharmacists today, better outcomes tomorrow”. The congress is being hosted by FIP in collaboration with the Pharmaceutical Association of Thailand under Royal Patronage.

PRESS CONTACT
Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager
International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email: linnam@fip.org

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Mujica’s marijuana meets stumbling block: pharmacists say “no” (12-06-2014)

Images for download

Eduardo Savio

Michel Buchmann

Dr Eduardo Savio Dr Michel Buchmann

 

Article for download

Marijuana: the haze that threatens to cloud perceptions of pharmacy (IPJ 2014:32(1))


Release

Mujica’s marijuana meets stumbling block: pharmacists say “no”

12 June 2014, The Hague

Although sales of marijuana for recreational use are expected to begin in November, Uruguay’s pharmacists are saying “no”. The country’s professional body for pharmacists, the AQFU, is campaigning against cannabis for non-medical purposes being distributed from pharmacies, and is now seeking legal advice on a challenge to President Mujica’s new marijuana law.

In an article published in the International Pharmacy Journal this week, Eduardo Savio, spokesman for the AQFU and president of the Pharmaceutical Forum of the Americas, explains: “Pharmacists have studied to be health professionals, to help people to have a better life, improve their health and well-being. To participate in drug distribution for recreational use goes against this philosophy. Moreover, supply from pharmacies is not right because it diminishes the perception of risk of harm from using cannabis for the population. The image pharmacy has within society will be changed once this takes place.”

“The grounds for a legal challenge may be that the marijuana law requests pharmacists to perform a task that is contrary to their ethical obligation and their right not to harm people,” Dr Savio says. The AQFU is also considering asking all pharmacists to refuse to work for pharmacies that request a licence for cannabis distribution.

Today it launched a petition for changes to be made so that marijuana for recreational use is not supplied from pharmacies. It is asking pharmacists from all over the world, and others, to sign it.

A number of leading pharmacy organisations, including the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) and the South American Pharmaceutical Federation (FEFAS), support the AQFU campaign.

“It is our opinion that substances, which are not utilised for therapeutic, palliative or diagnostic purposes but instead are used (or abused) for recreational ends, should not be provided to their users through community pharmacies. This would be the case for marijuana, as it is the case for alcoholic beverages and tobacco products. It is clear that marijuana may have a negative impact on health,” FIP president Michel Buchmann says.

The petition against supply of recreational cannabis from pharmacies can be found at http://chn.ge/1lhxnKh


Notes for editors

ABOUT FIP and the International Pharmacy Journal (IPJ)
The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global federation of national associations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, and is in official relations with the World Health Organization. Through its 126 member organisations, it represents over three million practitioners and scientists around the world. www.fip.org
The IPJ is the official journal of FIP.

ABOUT the AQFU and pharmacy in Uruguay
Established in 1888, the Asociación de Química y Farmacia del Uruguay is one of the oldest professional organisations in Latin America. More than half of Uruguay’s pharmacists are members. Although it is common for many pharmacies in Uruguay to run without a pharmacist present all of the time, every pharmacy must have a pharmacist technical director.


PRESS CONTACT
Lin-Nam Wang, communications manager
International Pharmaceutical Federation
Email: linnam@fip.org